Apr 062016
 

elitefts I have often felt that lifting weights and sports in general can teach us many things about ourselves and life. The last several years I have felt that our society has become far too accommodating to the detriment of all of us, so when this article was brought to my attention as something to post on the site I jumped at the chance. This story is from Charlie Bounty and posted by his friend Harry Selkow over at EliteFTS blogs. It’s an incredibly powerful message that I think everyone needs to read.
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In Nashville, Tennessee, during the first week of January, 1996, more than 4,000 baseball coaches descended upon the Opryland Hotel for the 52nd annual ABCA convention.

While I waited in line to register with the hotel staff, I heard other more veteran coaches rumbling about the lineup of speakers scheduled to present during the weekend. One name, in particular, kept resurfacing, always with the same sentiment — “John Scolinos is here? Oh man, worth every penny of my airfare.”

Who the heck is John Scolinos, I wondered. Well, in 1996 Coach Scolinos was 78 years old and five years retired from a college coaching career that began in 1948. No matter, I was just happy to be there.

He shuffled to the stage to an impressive standing ovation, wearing dark polyester pants, a light blue shirt, and a string around his neck from which home plate hung — a full-sized, stark-white home plate. Pointed side down.

Seriously, I wondered, who in the hell is this guy?

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  One Response to “Keep Yourself at Seventeen Inches”

  1. Hi Dean,

    A great post with an extremely powerful message put in a relatively simple but ingenious way.
    I think I will always remember the lesson of that wise old coach from what I’ve read. It must have been a fantastic experience to have been there at the speech!

    Graham. (((——)))

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